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Albuquerque City Council

The City Council is the legislative authority of the city. It has the power to adopt all ordinances, resolutions, or other legislation conducive to the welfare of the people of the city.

The Council is made up of nine members, elected on staggered terms, with four or five districted Councilors elected every two years for a four-year term. In this election, Districts 2, 4, 6 and 8 are up for vote.

To qualify, each candidate must be at least eighteen years of age, a United States citizen, a registered, qualified elector of the city and a resident of the city for at least one year prior to the date of filing their Declaration of Candidacy. Must submit a petition containing the signatures of 500 registered city voters within the district to the City Clerk within a period specified by the City Charter. Salary: Councilors earn $30,000 annually. The Council President earns $32,000 annually.

District 2

Joseph Griego

Joseph Griego, Candidate for Albuquerque City Council, District 2
  1. What qualifies you to be a city councilor? My experience as a police officer, EMT, and small business owner, as well as raised with a sense of community involvement qualify me to be a city councilor.  We can’t rely on individuals who are seeking public office as a stepping stone.  District 2 needs a steady voice like former Councilor Vincent Griego, I’m ready to be that steady voice.
  2. What are the top priorities for your district? Economic Development, Crime, and Infrastructure.  Each of these areas deserve more than a 65 word response.  I invite you email me at joseph@griegoforabq.com for a more detailed response.
  3. What more should be done to reduce crime in your district? For true community policing to work we have to provide resources to our neighborhood associations and community leaders to become active partners in dealing with crime.  We need to provide them with training and resources (Radios, cameras, printing) to report crime and zoning issues.
  4. What do you think should be done to improve the quality of life in Albuquerque? Our communities must be empowered with resources need to create a safe Albuquerque. Create tax incentives for true small businesses to grow and provide them with the resources needed to grow.   We can’t just attract out of state corporations to New Mexico, we have to invest in the small businesses we have right here at home.

Zackary Quintero

Zackary Quintero, Candidate for Albuquerque City Council, District 2
  1. What qualifies you to be a city councilor? I have direct work experience in our community and local government and would be the only economist on city council. I worked as a city economist before attending UNM Law School and developed statewide projects that helped keep our graduates in New Mexico. I graduated UNM Law with a focus on environmental law and constitutional rights.  I currently serve on the Air Quality Control Board.
  2. What are the top priorities for your district? The top priorities for our district are crime, homelessness, bringing life back to downtown, and protecting the Bosque. We need to have a designated transition plan for homelessness and portable services that help people who struggle with mental health and addiction issues. We need new police officers to be recruited from communities in ABQ. We need to use local money for local businesses and labor.
  3. What more should be done to reduce crime in your district? I am the only candidate endorsed by our police and firefighter unions. This is because my plan for reducing crime builds from our community first. I would restore the residential burglary team to APD, create a digital platform for real time feedback between officers and business owners, and recruit new hires directly from historic neighborhoods who live in the community.
  4. What do you think should be done to improve the quality of life in Albuquerque? We can improve the quality of life by prioritizing public safety, public health, and economic opportunity. We need parks that are safe to take our children and pets to while also having a downtown that is inviting to new local businesses and families of all ages. We need better lighting, safer roads, and updated sidewalks in areas that are used by our seniors and kids.

Robert Raymond Blanquera Nelson

Robert Raymond Blanquera Nelson, Candidate for Albuquerque City Council, District 2
  1. What qualifies you to be a city councilor? City Council is unique because it demands a deep connection to our community to be effective.  As an immigrant and working-class person of color, I understand what real systemic change requires because I’ve lived through systemic injustice. And after a decade of listening, organizi
  2. What are the top priorities for your district? After talking with thousands of community members, the most important issues that people want to address are homelessness, crime, and economic opportunity. There’s also a deeper yearning for an overall change in how we address social issues: our community is tired of isolated bandaid solutions and want City Council to focus on broader visions of holistic progress and wellbeing. 
  3. What more should be done to reduce crime in your district? Crime is a product of desperation and neglect. Truly reducing it means addressing it as a public health issue: identifying the root causes of crime then implementing solutions which prevent those fundamental issues. Right now, the most pressing systemic issues pushing people to commit crime are a lack of affordable housing, mental health infrastructure, and drug rehabilitation resources; all things that we can solve.
  4. What do you think should be done to improve the quality of life in Albuquerque? First, we have to stabilize our community by breaking the cycle of systemic issues. This starts with developing our first Public Health Department to guide City Hall in developing informed solutions. Next, we close gaps in gender and racial equity throughout our city. Increased social connectedness will then unlock unprecedented levels of economic potential and social wellbeing, bringing us to the top of the list.

Isaac Benton

Isaac Benton, Candidate for Albuquerque City Council, District 2
  1. What qualifies you to be a city councilor? I’ve represented our community on the Council since 2006. It’s been an honor to serve our center city, valley, and university neighborhoods. I’ve helped lead passage of initiatives like police reform, renewable energy and conservation, environmental protection, affordable housing, transportation equity, safer streets, and immigrant-affirming policies. As a social architect by profession, my life’s work has been built on the values of equity and inclusion.
  2. What are the top priorities for your district? Our top priority is public safety—increasing community policing and reducing gun violence. Opportunities for jobs must be seized—having spearheaded the purchase of the Railyards in 2007, I’m particularly excited about our partnership with CNM’s film institute moving there. I am deeply committed to strong public investments in our older and historic neighborhoods that build commerce.  Leading in water, environmental, and  conservation positions us better economically.
  3. What more should be done to reduce crime in your district? Today, we continue rebuilding APD, hiring more officers and rather than fighting DOJ, implementing the reform that the settlement (which I support) requires. Commitments to community policing are also now increasing, including the popular bike patrols. To reduce gun violence, we must take action locally. I passed a “red flag” resolution, urging state action to remove firearms from dangerous people, but we must do more.
  4. What do you think should be done to improve the quality of life in Albuquerque? With the election of Mayor Keller in 2017, we turned a new page in Albuquerque. He shares my values about investing in and improving Albuquerque’s city center, and our traditional historic neighborhoods and corridors. We must build more affordable and supportive housing, rehabilitate affordable homes in historic neighborhoods, modernize antiquated infrastructure, and incentivize infill development. Those in turn support small businesses that serve our neighborhoods.

Connie Vigil

Connie Vigil, Candidate for Albuquerque City Council, District 2
  1. What qualifies you to be a city councilor? Served 2 years City Council, Experienced in city policy and procedures, Obtained a national grant to build a community center, Founded GABA- a nonprofit that will build a housing and job development campus for homeless in Albuquerque, Worked with state,county & city leaders the last 6 years to find solutions to our  drug addiction and homeless crisis.
  2. What are the top priorities for your district? Addressing drug addiction, homelessness caused by addictions with long-term treatment centers for substance abuse and mental illness funded by state and federal government, Fund transitional homeless campus- GV for individuals, vets and families, Hold BERNCO accountable for behavioral tax spending, Start commuter buses, and ART with no fines, Create national soccer and bicycle events,
  3. What more should be done to reduce crime in your district? Increase DNA lab capacity and judges, narcotics agents, drug-court programs and mental health facilities paid for by State/Federal funding, Stop theft, vandalism violent crime using DNA, instead of only visual record, Stiff community service sentencing , Publish DWI s  in news & double fines, Make neighborhood policing accountable,
  4. What do you think should be done to improve the quality of life in Albuquerque? Our city has major crime, drug, and homeless issues. We comprehensive, long term plans using examples from other cities that work, not citizen committees! City, county, state & federal officials need to work cooperatively. When drug and crime is reduced, we will no longer need our police to attend to homeless, but to the serious crime issues that should take highest priority.

Steve Baca

Steve Baca, Candidate for Albuquerque City Council, District 2
  1. What qualifies you to be a city councilor? I am a 5th generation District 2 native, and know the intricacies, facets and culture of the district. Growing up in District 2 I have witnessed the changes and problem areas first hand. There are many areas of the district that have been forgotten by our leaders and I plan on being their voice.
  2. What are the top priorities for your district? The major issues I feel are in my district are also my top priorities. I would like to tackle the high crime rate, drugs and homelessness.
  3. What more should be done to reduce crime in your district? There are several factors that we first need to implement to reduce crime. Get rid of the McClendon Settlement, it prevents APD from arresting criminals for misdemeanor offenses. Renegotiate the DOJ agreement to allow our Police Officers’ to do their job. APD also needs to be responsive to its communities in regard to the concern for crime.
  4. What do you think should be done to improve the quality of life in Albuquerque? First and foremost, we as a city and community need to tackle crime, once we do this, everything else will fall in place. Businesses fear opening stores, and residents are in fear to live here because of theft. This leads to loss of jobs and growth for our city.

District 4

Athena Ann Christodoulou

Athena Ann Christodoulou, Candidate for Albuquerque City Council, District 4
  1. What qualifies you to be a city councilor? A retired Navy engineer, I have experience on the ABQ energy council and state legislative processes. I’ve served my country, my family, and am ready to serve my city full-time.  I listen and  research before acting. A fiscally responsible businesswoman, I hold others to abide by the triple-bottom line of people, planet, and profits. I live the solutions to climate change and it is sweet!
  2. What are the top priorities for your district? Ensure safety of our children now and in the future, by addressing crime and climate crisis. Mayor Keller and APD are working toward better community policing and I will ensure the best methods are kept. ABQ has many residents who can act on choices to live the solutions to climate crisis. In both cases, education, good policies, and community collaboration spell success.
  3. What more should be done to reduce crime in your district? Our community are predominantly law-abiding citizens. Educating D4 residents on community policing efforts, digital neighborhood watch, and the funding of police service aides would reduce crime. Offering robust summer and after school youth activities and pre-K programs will raise the level for all. We are 1ABQ, so I would work with the rest of council to help their districts as well.
  4. What do you think should be done to improve the quality of life in Albuquerque? We all want a safe community and opportunities to succeed. D4 has a wonderful quality of life. One to be envied sometimes. We love and look out for each other. We pursue excellence. We want the rest of Albuquerque to thrive as well. We are 1ABQ, so I would work with the rest of council to help their districts as well.

Ane C. Romero

Ane C. Romero, Candidate for Albuquerque City Council, District 4
  1. What qualifies you to be a city councilor? I have spent my entire academic and professional career in public service working on issues related to public safety, healthcare, education and economic development. Since 2017, I have served on the Northeast Heights Community Policing Council and have seen first-hand how public safety relates to the serious behavioral health challenges facing Albuquerque. I hope to bring my federal, state, and local experience to City Council. 
  2. What are the top priorities for your district? Top priorities are reducing crime—adding more police officers and resources to support our first responders, while tackling root causes like mental health, substance abuse, and homelessness. We must harness job growth opportunities and economic development in areas like workforce development, film, renewable energy, and provide support for small businesses. I also support expanding early childhood development programs and the City’s before-and-after school programs. 
  3. What more should be done to reduce crime in your district? We must increase the number of police officers to improve neighborhood patrolling and police response time. We need improved infrastructure such as better lighting in neighborhoods and shopping centers; additional neighborhood watch programs and more coordinated collaboration with neighborhood associations; and a one-stop shop for individuals suffering from mental illness, homelessness, and substance abuse to provide treatment and services that will reduce drug-related criminal behavior.
  4. What do you think should be done to improve the quality of life in Albuquerque? We need to create opportunities for hard working people in our city to succeed and want to stay in Albuquerque. We must invest in our students, teachers, and schools in order to provide a healthy and robust workforce. The root causes of crime, homelessness and addiction must be addressed and we need to provide support for our existing small businesses to thrive and grow.

Brook L. Bassan

Brook L. Bassan, Candidate for Albuquerque City Council, District 4
  1. What qualifies you to be a city councilor? I am an Albuquerque native born to a family of local small business owners and have never moved.  My four children all attend APS and I serve as PTA President, Financial Officer of NMPTA, Board Member of Nor Este Neighborhood Association, and was awarded New Mexico Mother of the Year®.  On City Council I will represent the concerns of all residents regardless of party affiliation.
  2. What are the top priorities for your district? Growing our economy by addressing the current crime epidemic. There must be a meaningful reduction in property crime, violent crime, drug abuse, and homelessness in order to attract high paying jobs. Albuquerque should encourage the growth of small business by not burdening them with increased regulations. District 4 also needs to become more family friendly by increasing the number of indoor and outdoor recreational activities.
  3. What more should be done to reduce crime in your district? I am proud that the Albuquerque Police Officers Association has endorsed my campaign. They know I will fight to put more police officers on our streets and support our officers when it comes to enforcing the laws, so criminals are not in charge. There must be consequences when people commit any crime, including jail time that is not a revolving door. 
  4. What do you think should be done to improve the quality of life in Albuquerque? In addition to addressing the crime epidemic plaguing our city, Albuquerque City Council should promote the development of indoor and outdoor recreational activities. We should build the proposed new soccer stadium and other sports venues to attract a greater number of regional tournaments. District 4 also deserves to have an indoor swimming pool and a splash park constructed at the North Domingo Baca Multigeneration Center. 

District 6

Patrick M. Davis

Patrick M. Davis, Candidate for Albuquerque City Council, District 6
  1. What qualifies you to be a city councilor? I’ve proudly served as District 6 City Councilor for nearly four years.  As Mayor Keller said, “From community policing to sustainability, Pat Davis has been a partner and leader among his colleagues on city council.” I’ve successfully passed legislation protecting immigrants, funded our gun buyback and brought more than $5 million in funding to neighborhood projects benefiting our district. 
  2. What are the top priorities for your district? Over the past year, we’ve added more than 100 new officers and I brought back bike patrols to Central Avenue. But we have more to do.  Our priorities include adding the 200 officers we need to more quickly investigate gun crimes and child abuse, and equally funding homeless services to provide housing and behavioral health services in our neighborhoods instead of just downtown.
  3. What more should be done to reduce crime in your district? I’m tired of waiting on DC or Santa Fe to take on gun violence. That’s why I funded our first gun buyback program in 6 years, taking 400 guns off our streets.  I sponsored new laws requiring unattended guns be secured so children and criminals can’t access them. Next, we need to devote 20 of our next 200 APD hires to investigating gun crimes. 
  4. What do you think should be done to improve the quality of life in Albuquerque? We all love Albuquerque and I’m proud to see that we are finally getting it back on track.  I’m encouraging voters to support our bonds which includes millions in our older neighborhoods for ADA sidewalk improvements, neighborhood traffic management like speed bumps, our new International District library, redevelopment of old properties, and millions for SE-area park improvements.

Gina Naomi Dennis

Gina Naomi Dennis, Candidate for Albuquerque City Council, District 6
  1. What qualifies you to be a city councilor? Albuquerque Organizer for 4 years: President, District 6 Coalition, seventeen Neighborhoods, 2017 to 2019; Organizer across Albuquerque neighborhoods, 2015 to 2019. Attorney for 15 years: Federal regulatory law, Tribal law (licensed in DC). 8-year CEO: Small business owner, green building specialist, LEED AP. White House Intern, Office of President, Oval Office 1999. Juris Doctor degree 2003, MBA degree 2005, BA degree 2000.
  2. What are the top priorities for your district? Priority: addressing the failures of A.R.T. (bus transit), such as the many, many problems caused by A.R.T. and the over 100 Businesses crushed by A.R.T. Priority: Community Safety, such as Community Policing and concerns about Police Response Time, and Excessive Speeding and Crashes on Lead, Coal, and Copper. Priority: addressing the rising Homelessness and underlying issues of Opioid Addiction and Mental Health.
  3. What more should be done to reduce crime in your district?  Eighty to eighty five percent (80 to 85%) of crimes are committed while someone is high or trying to get high. Let’s reduce our Opioid Addiction rate so that we can reduce our crime rate. Let’s also support our public schools and support our local, small businesses. Let’s also improve the resource management of APD, such as police response time.
  4. What do you think should be done to improve the quality of life in Albuquerque? When residents speak about the failed A.R.T. (bus transit) project and other problems, let’s follow the public input. Let’s restore our Historic Route 66 Central Avenue and our Small Businesses, improve Community Safety, address Speeding and Traffic, improve Public Health, address Homelessness, Addiction, and Mental Health, support our Public Schools, improve Street lighting, address Vacant and Abandoned Properties, and improve our Parks.

District 8

S. Maurreen Skowran

S. Maurreen Skowran, Candidate for Albuquerque City Council, District 8
  1. What qualifies you to be a city councilor? My service in the Marine Corps instilled a lifelong desire to serve, and it taught me how to lead a team and the importance of creating a plan to achieve success. As a Marine, I specialized in aviation support. Today, as a data analyst, I study traffic crashes, pedestrian safety and DWIs. I firmly believe evidence-based solutions are needed to address underlying problems in Albuquerque.
  2. What are the top priorities for your district? Measurable crime reduction; comprehensive approach to addressing homelessness; effective plans to increase pedestrian and traffic safety on main thoroughfares and residential streets; upgrading and expanding parks and community and senior centers; advocating for the district on City Council, and holding town halls and monthly office hours to maintain open lines of communication.
  3. What more should be done to reduce crime in your district? More community patrol officers need to be assigned, the hours of operation and number of police personnel at the in-district James Dwyer substation need to be expanded, and plans for crime reduction need to be developed based on neighborhood crime patterns. Proactive measures such as improved lighting have been proven to reduce crime and should be implemented, starting with higher-crime hot spots.
  4. What do you think should be done to improve the quality of life in Albuquerque? We need to not only solve problems but prevent them, by reducing the sources of crime starting with programs that interrupt the cycle of criminality and addiction; by providing affordable housing to working families at risk of becoming homeless; by providing pre-school, after-school and summer programs for children; by regularly re-investing in our communities; and by protecting our water supply, air quality, and natural resources.

Trudy E. Jones

Trudy E. Jones, Candidate for Albuquerque City Council, District 8
  1. What qualifies you to be a city councilor? I represent District 8 with the values and discipline that I would expect from someone representing me.  My record supporting police and fire, standing up for fiscal responsibility, and working to improve our community centers, libraries and infrastructure will continue during my next term. Unlike my opponent who is running as an ultra-progressive liberal, I believe our city council must use common-sense to find common-ground. 
  2. What are the top priorities for your district? The top priorities for this district revolve around quality of life issues and that starts with keeping our neighborhoods safe by fighting crime. I am proud that the Albuquerque Police Officers Association has endorsed by campaign.  Quality of life also includes improving bike paths, parks, and community centers.  Quality of life is about making memories in Albuquerque with family and friends that last a lifetime.
  3. What more should be done to reduce crime in your district? We must protect our neighborhoods, rather than protecting criminals. For example, I strongly oppose the sanctuary city policy for illegal immigrants who commit crimes that my opponent’s backers support and implemented.  It is also critical that we give more support to our police officers. My record of being tough on crime is clear and that’s why the Albuquerque Police Officers Association has endorsed my candidacy.  
  4. What do you think should be done to improve the quality of life in Albuquerque? City government must focus on basic services, like police and fire, improving parks and bike paths and making it easier for businesses to grow and create jobs.  Improving quality of life starts with cracking down on crime to create safe neighborhoods.  Wasteful government spending threatens our ability to improve quality of life and that’s why I have been such a strong voice for fiscal discipline.