Menu

CNM Community College

For information on CNM bond issues, see https://www.lwvcnm.org/2019-voter-guide-to-municipal-election/aps-and-cnm-ballot-questions/


Central New Mexico Community College, governed by seven board members is the largest community college in New Mexico, with more than 22,000 students. CNM provides affordable higher education throughout Albuquerque and its surrounding areas.

The Central New Mexico Community College (CNM) Governing Board is an elected group of individuals, constituting a lawful political subdivision, who represent the population of the CNM District.  The Board consists of seven members elected to four-year terms from districts within the overall College district, which includes Bernalillo County plus Corrales and Rio Rancho in Sandoval County.  Board members for Districts 2, 4 and 6 are up for election in 2019.

The Board is responsible for policies that govern all phases of the educational program within the College, and adopts and declares Policy Statements addressing the mission, vision, values and goals of the College. The policies provide a general operating climate for College employees, students and other citizens and guide decisions related to the attainment of desired educational objectives.

District 2

James A. Chavez

James A. Chavez, candidate for CNM Board District 2
  1. What qualifies you to be a CNM governing board member? The board is called upon to make decision based upon recommendations from staff and others. To make good decisions the board must take the time and effort to understand each issue and must listen to all points of view with the paramount goal of helping faculty, staff, and students within the parameters of CNM’s mission and statutory mandate. My brief time on the board has demonstrated I am qualified.
  2. What should the mission of CNM be? The mission of CNM is contained in the mission statement. The board’s role is to support the mission statement.
  3. What kind of vocational training programs need to be established to increase employment opportunity in Albuquerque? It is impossible to name all areas where CNM provide relevant vocational education to bolster the Albuquerque and New Mexico economy. Examples are computer coding, video arts, design, culinary, building trades and the wide variety of vocational education offered. It is not the board’s function to design vocational programs, that is left to the professional staff. The board’s role is to evaluate programs in light of the overall mission of CNM.
  4. What would you do to attract additional qualified teaching staff? First, the pay and benefits must be competitive. Second, we must ensure an inclusive work environment free of discrimination. Third, we must foster a teamwork approach where all faculty and staff (and students) have a stake in the success of this institution.

District 4

Annette Chavez y de la Cruz

Annette Chavez y de la Cruz, candidate for CNM Board, District 4
  1. What qualifies you to be a CNM governing board member? I have a 31-year career in education, the last 17 years at CNM with accomplishments supporting and advancing student success in positions as Director of the South Valley Campus, Director of the Job Connection Center, and HR Representative. I am passionate about education. I have been passionate about my, my husband’s, my children’s, and my community’s education.Education provides hope and opportunity, and is truly transformative.
  2. What should the mission of CNM be? CNM’s mission should be and is to “Be a Leader in Education and Training.” CNM is both the state’s largest community college and the largest higher education institution in New Mexico based on undergraduate enrollment. CNM supports students in achieving their educational and workforce training goals. As such, CNM is a key partner in and contributor to the state’s economic development, prosperity and social well-being.
  3. What kind of vocational training programs need to be established to increase employment opportunity in Albuquerque? CNM offers 200+ associate degrees, certificates and training options.  In its’ 55-year history, CNM’s career-technical programs in trades, health, technologies, and business have been refined to anticipate and/or meet the needs of local employers. Responsive and nimble leadership at the Governing Board and executive level will ensure that CNM stays at the forefront of community needs and national trends. An example is CNM’s film program.
  4. What would you do to attract additional qualified teaching staff? I will continue to support policy and practice that results in respectful treatment of all employees, competitive compensation and benefits, and job security. Ensuring CNM’s compelling and numerous stories of “Changing Lives, Building Community” and as an award winning college are showcased in local, regional, and national recruitment is paramount. I will continue to serve as one of CNM’s ambassadors in this way.

District 6

Layne E. McAdoo

Layne McAdoo, Candidate for CNM Board, District 6
  1. What qualifies you to be a CNM governing board member? As a retired longtime CNM instructor, I learned the very specific needs of CNM students, faculty, and staff.  As a sociologist, I have significant familiarity with the special challenges facing CNM’s many low-income, minority, ethnically diverse, and first-generation college students. The insights of my experience and education would make me valuable as a board member.
  2. What should the mission of CNM be? In addition to spurring the economic development of New Mexico with high-quality education and training, I believe that the most important responsibility CNM has is to provide its students the “bootstraps” to become educationally and economically successful.  I believe that CNM can and should provide the bootstraps essential for that task.
  3. What kind of vocational training programs need to be established to increase employment opportunity in Albuquerque? The following programs could further increase employment in Albuquerque: Addictions/Substance Abuse Technology, Environmental Technology, Sports Medicine Technology, Specialized Recreation Activity Technology (used to work with seniors or disabled children or adults), Occupational Therapy Technology, Dialysis Technology, Equine Therapy Technology, Solar Technology, and Wind Energy Technology.
  4. What would you do to attract additional qualified teaching staff? I would increase wages and decrease teaching workload. I would allow newly-minted high-quality graduates to be hired without requiring four semesters of post-secondary teaching experience.  I would offer incentives that include step-raises for longevity and outstanding performance, opportunity for professional development, educational subsidies for additional educational attainment, and a promise that CNM will show respect and appreciation for their work.

Lorraine Lopez Trujillo

Lorraine Lopez Trujillo, candidate for CNM Board, District 6
  1. What qualifies you to be a CNM governing board member? I currently serve on the CNM Governing Board and I served on the TVI board from 1996-1999. I have had a lengthy career in education and workforce development, spanning from early childhood through adult education. I have a bachelor’s degree in home economics, with an emphasis in early childhood education, and a master’s de
  2. What should the mission of CNM be? CNM should serve as a leader in providing students with skills they can use in the workforce, as needs change with economic development. We must continue that leadership as corporations come to New Mexico, and need specialized training. We must meet the needs of our community and students in providing degrees which will transfer to universities thus keeping the cost down for students.
  3. What kind of vocational training programs need to be established to increase employment opportunity in Albuquerque? Not everyone wants a University degree. Vocational programs meet the needs of our community in plumbing, construction, welding, automobile programs, CDL, electrical, etc. These programs should be flexible, and meet the needs of students and the community, so graduates can secure employment. We must provide a skilled and flexible workforce.
  4. What would you do to attract additional qualified teaching staff? Teaching staff is the backbone of CNM, and is exemplary. Because of our staff we are number one in country in graduating Native American and Hispanic students, and number two in overall graduation. We strive to pay our employees a good salary and are unionized. We recruit the best people and provide great benefits. We are self insured to keep the cost down.